The Name is Bond…


 

Away from the noises of city life in the hilly green areas of Mussoorie lives the beloved Rusty.He enjoys short naps, long walk beside the hills and his room full of books.   

 

Most of our Readers would have read his stories as kids either in their textbooks or would have watched movies based on his books (Saat Khoon Maaf,Junoon, )This Beloved Children’s author who is nearly 80 years old will make you laugh and smile with his witty humour, spell bounding storytelling and his mischievous smile.

 

He prefers maintaining a low profile and confines himself to the greener pastures of Mussoorie .Not very fond of travelling he prefers only to get out of his comfort zone only to meet his readers and audience. A Bona fide lazy person as he calls himself his daily routine consists of eat sleep and read.

His New Fiction book Titles Maharani has recently released by Penguin India across stores.

 

When we put him in hot seat, here’s what he had to say..

 

You have stayed in Mussoorie for so many years. Whereas authors prefer to travel a lot to draw inspiration. Does the city of hills make you a better author?

I have been living here since 50 year now. Love the greenery around me.  Have grown trees here and watch them grow. I enjoy spending time writing here by the hill side.  My adopted family is here and they take good care of me here. One of the major reasons I moved to Mussoorie was in 60’s I had just left Delhi to be  a free-lance writer and Mussoorie seemed the natural option to shift because of the proximity. Also I am in love with the city and don’t feel like going anywhere.

 

How much of your self do you portray in your books?

I am a very subjective writer. For me Fiction always overtakes reality. Of what I write 2/3 accounts for fiction and the rest all are experiences I draw from my own life. Most of my stories are written in the first person context so people tend to conclude the stories are based on my life. My writings draw inspirations from childhood memories and people who I have met over the years. I  suffer from vivid imaginations which are purely fictitious.

 

Your new book Maharani talks about love and friendship. How does the Mr Ruskin Bond perceive love to be?

(Laughing) Well I have always been in love.. I was in love in 20’s in my 30’s in my 40’s. I have never stopped falling out of love. I have just stopped  expecting the same intensity of love that I feel. My expectations and imagination of love is always high due to which I have had some disappointments in life. Probably one of the reasons I never got married.  I think I am charming, cynical at times,  not  bad catch after all.

 

Tell us some peculiar characteristics about Maharani ?

Bold..Unconventional..Strong Minded..Entertaining..Smart..Has had Many affairs in the past.. She is somebody who will keep you glued to the book.

 

Your Favourite reads..

I have grown up reading books that were written in 40’s and the 50’s,.. I like to read a lot of Detective fiction and Crime Novels by Peter Robinson, Robert Gordon. My favourite book currently is ‘Wuthering Heights’ by Emily Bronte. I read it some 60 years back and it had kept me up all night and when I picked the book again to read it currently it again kept me up all night.. That to me is a test of a good novel. Plus the characters in the book are very strong and gripping. Also Emily Bronte writing is very passionate.

 

In the days when authors and publishers are catching on social media bandwagon and promoting themselves heavily you choose to stay aloof from all of it..your views..?

I think it’s the need of the hour since there are some writers and publishing houses spread all across. And competition is increasing. When I had starting writing I use to send the books out to the world hoping that somebody will read.. Scenarios have changed a lot today the backgrounds of my time were different and of today are different.. I grew up during the British Raj and today kids grow up with mobile, internet, tv and much more. The only thing constant is the writing values that a writer possesses. These days’ writers talk about their book on Facebook and all. But for me I prefer the old fashion way.. I keep away from the limelight. I always prefer to connect to my readers face to face.. I stay away from literary festivals as there are more so over for authors to meet together. Also I prefer stepping out and do a bookstore reading or session for my readers. You see we authors have big egos and we need to be pleased all the time through different mediums… even though I have a big ego, my way of life is very reserved to my readers and family and I prefer it that way. You can call me an old school person.

 

About Maharani:

Maharani who drink too much, the real story of Jim Corbett, and friendly ghosts – a magical novella from Ruskin Bond! 

H.H. is the spoilt, selfish, beautiful widow of the Maharajah of Mastipur. She lives with her dogs and her caretaker, Hans, in an enormous old house in Mussorie, taking lovers and discarding them, drinking too much, and fending off her reckless sons who are waiting hungrily for their inheritance. The seasons come and go, hotels burns down, cinemas shut shop, and people leave the hill station never to return. But H.H. remains constant and indomitable. Observing her antics, often with disapproval, is her old friend Ruskin, who can never quite cut himself off from her. Melancholic, wry and full of charm, Maharani is a delightful novella about love, death and friendship. 

About The Author
Ruskin Bond is the acclaimed author of over five hundred novellas, stories, essays and poetry, all of which has established him as one of the India’s most beloved writers. His most recent work are Secrets and Susannas Seven Husbands which was turned into the film Saat Khoon Maaf. He was awarded the Sahitya Akademi Award in 1993 and the Padma Shri in 1999.

 

Price: Rs 299  

 

Signing off for Now..

 

Until Next time Geeks.

 

Happy Reading!

 

Crossword Bookstores.

India’s Dan Brown!!


Hello & Welcome Back Book lovers.

 

We bring to you the latest happening in the world of books.

 

Mysteries..Secrets..Lies…Revelations..Twisted Plots..Unexpected Relations…Decoding..Uncoding The Past, Present & Future..  

 

If this intrigues you ‘Ashwin Sanghi’ is definitely the author to watch out for.

 

A established and successful businessman by day and thrilling author by Night..Mr Sanghi is an all rounder. His books are a complete page tuner and keep you glued till the very end.

 

He has penned 2 thriller novels which won wide acclaims and awards. ‘The Rozabal Line’ was his first novel followed by ‘Chanakya Chant’ which won the Crossword Book Award Popular 2010. Ashwin  is one of the Bestselling Indian Authors of Today and he writes primarily on theological & historical thrillers. Currently he is pursuing a PHD in Creative Writing.

 

His New Book ‘The Krishna Key’ releases Today at a Crossword Bookstore near you.

 

Here is an extract from his interview..

 

1. You are called the Dan Brown of India… your sentiments on this tag. Have you also read his books?

 

I am rather flattered by the Dan Brown comparison… at last count he had sold over eighty million books! And yes, I have read all of Dan Brown’s books. However, I believe that the comparison is misplaced. While it is true that my novels are what could be called ‘historical conspiracies’, there are many authors who write in that genre besides Dan Brown… Steve Berry, Raymond Khoury and Alex Rutherford, to name just a few.

 

2. You’re the recipient of the Crossword Book Award-Popular 2010 and Chanakya’s Chant still continues to dominate the bestseller charts. Did you expect this reward and recognition?

 

I secretly wished that it would be a grand success but did not realistically expect it to happen. In a country where most youngsters prefer reading about campus romance, I did not believe that historical fiction with a contemporary political twist would be appreciated. Subsequent sales volumes proved me wrong though. The Crossword Popular Choice Award 2010 and UTV’s decision to make a movie on the book were the proverbial icing on the cake.

 

3. Your new book ‘The Krishna Key’ is soon going to be in all bookstores. Your readers’ expectations are definitely going to be high from this book. Are you nervous and excited about the same?

 

I am both nervous and excited. Nervous—because I do not want to disappoint my readers. Excited—because I love the plot of ‘The Krishna Key’. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that my readers will love it too!

 

4. Could tell us an interesting character or paragraph from your new book?

 

Here’s a paragraph that should give you a taste of what lies within:

Resigned to an only partial victory and having surveyed his handiwork, he took out a Swann-Morton scalpel that had been custom-engraved with the initials ‘R.M.’ from his belt bag, bent down over Varshney’s comatose body and with surgical precision thrust the scalpel into the sole of Varshney’s left foot, leaving it embedded in the flesh. It gashed through an artery. Blood spurted out while Varshney—still unconscious—began his long and agonising march towards death. The killer next took out an paintbrush from his belt pack. He gently dipped it into the puddle of blood that had formed around Varshney’s left foot and began to write, with the air of a calligrapher, on the wall above Varshney’s head: Mleccha-nivaha-nidhane kalayasi karavalam, dhumaketum iva kim api karalam,

kesava dhrita-kalki-sarira jaya jagadisa hare.

 

5. Do you plan on sticking to the historical thriller genre?

 

No. I simply want to spin yet another good old-fashioned yarn. I want to narrate stories in which the twists and turns keep you glued to the novel till three in the morning. The premise of the story should be delicious—bordering on outrageous perhaps—but history, theology or mythology is not a prerequisite. My next novel will have a touch of history because the story is built around an event that happened soon after Indian independence but it will be minimal.

 

6. According to you who are your contemporaries in Indian literature today?

 

Amish Tripathi, Mukul Deva, Vikram Chandra, Amitav Ghosh, Devdutt Pattanaik are among my favourites because they either write in the realm of history-mythology or write stories in the thriller genre. The list is growing rapidly though. Recent books by Manreet Sodhi Someshwar and Krishna Udayasankar seem to indicate that the interest in history and mythology is gaining momentum as we speak.

 

 

7. Working on a full time job and writing how do you manage both?

 

I write early mornings on weekdays and then put in a regular eight-hour day at the office. I use my Saturdays to gain writing momentum and leave Sundays entirely for family time. During the year I take four weeks off to write so that I may complete whatever happens to be my current project. Strong coffee in the morning and a peg of whiskey in the evening keep me going. Work keeps Lakshmi smiling and my writing keeps Saraswati in good humour… what more could I possibly ask for?

 

The Krishna Key

 

Publisher: Westland

 

Price:250

 

 

Signing off for Now..

 

Until Next Time Geeks

 

 

Happy Reading!

 

Crossword Bookstores

 

The New ‘It Bouy’ of Publishing


Hello & Welcome back Book Lovers to you daily dose of Bookipedia.

All you girls who just go gaga over SRK’s cute dimples its time you meet the new chocolate boy in town.

Known for his cute dimples and his quirky and heart wrenching love stories that have touched over millions of girls all over the country..Durjoy Datta is the shy author(boy) next door.

An engineer and MBA by profession he has already written 6 run away bestsellers in a span of 4 years. As a successful author he continued his journey by venturing into his own Publishing Company titled Grapevine India Publishers  which has published over 20 books till date. Durjoy is also the recipient of Teachers Achievement Award 2012.

 Charming..Witty..Versatile..Modest that’s how we describe Durjoy Datta..

 

Read more from his interview..

 

1.       You have so many female fan who worship and adore you and go crazy with your writing..How do you handle all the fame & attention?

It’s very flattering and it’s really not that hard to handle. Obviously, I feel great about it and wish it would go on! But I make sure I don’t get too stuck with it and concentrate on the work in hand.

 2.  Do you think you are a better writer when you work in collaboration with another author..As most of your books have been  co-authored by others.

I think it brings in a different perspective to the story. I might write something that doesn’t make sense, but since I write it, I win my arguments against common sense. When you have another author working in tandem, it’s becomes very hard to ignore details that might be important to the story. A co-author is a constant source of criticism and keeps me from running haywire.

    3.        Your New book ‘Someone Like you’ Comes out by the end of this year under  Penguin Books India..Why the shift in publishing your book?

Grapevine India was set up after I had already signed up with Penguin for this book. So that’s the reason. But I may choose to associate myself with other publishing houses too. To broaden my experience as an author, to work with different organizations and other editors and to learn from them. It’s a decision I have to take as an author and not as a founder of a publishing house.

4.       At 25 you have already written 6 books and have started your own publishing company. People at your age are still trying to figure out life and where they want to be..Your message to these budding young guns.

I never really had a timeline or an action plan to go by. I didn’t really decide that I have to have these many books published or start a publishing house. I just did what appealed to me the most and I am happy where it has taken me. My only message to others like me is to do what you most love. And if you do it well enough, other things will fall in place.

 

Now some Fun questions..

 

Your favorite Adventure holiday spot..

I think I enjoyed my stay in Budapest a lot. And I am an at-least-once-a-year-Goa person.

 

Your favorite romantic read.

 It keeps on changing. The last romance novel that I read was “The Last Song” and I quite liked it. Even “One Summer” by David Baldacci is a good read.

 

 Your current read..

I’m Not A Serial Killer by Dan Wells.

 

When you’re not working your..

 I am either out with friends, or well, reading a book!

 

Are you a typical Delhi boy..

       Oh yes, most certainly. I love my parties, I love my food, I love working out, I love honking in traffic jams and involve myself in road rage incidents. All the good parts, as well as the bad ones.

 

 Your fetish..

Is to be surrounded with books, women, great food and sports!

 

A memorable feedback from your fans..

A few days back, a girl tattooed the name of a protagonist from my book on her back. So that’s was pretty flattering and overwhelming!

 

Things who look for in an ideal partner..

Should be smart, funny, and non-clingy! Shouldn’t care too much about what she’s wearing and where she is going.  And good looks never hurt anybody.

 

Books By Durjoy  (@ Rs 100)

Of Course I Love You! …Till I Find Someone Better!

Now That You’re Rich! …Lets Fall In Love!

She Broke Up, I Didn’t! …I Just Kissed Someone Else!

Ohh Yes, I Am Single! …And So Is My Girlfriend!

You Were My Crush! …Till You Said You Love Me!

If It’s Not Forever… It’s Not Love!

 

Upcoming Books:

Till The Last Breath (Grapevine Publishers): September 2012

Someone Like You (Penguin India): December 2012

 

Signing off for now..

 

Do drop in your comments.

 

Until Next Time Geeks

 

Happy Reading!

 

Crossword Bookstores

‘Jugaad’ The Indian Way of Life


Jugaad is a word most commonly heard in India. It implies quick fix solution to any problem. It is a common phenomenon observe on the streets of India in small ways like fixing things with safety pins, turning cycles into a mobile shop of necessities, selling clothes by displaying it on the trees and many more..

A new book on the block ‘ Jugaad Innovation’ talks about how jugaad can help you find great solution to problems and can turn any adversity into an opportunity.

The 3 authors, Navi Radjou, Jaideep Prabhu, Simone Ahuja, talk about this phenomena that is helping MNC’s to develop breakthrough paths to grow in this competitive market.

A little more on about this dynamic trio:

Navi Radjou is an innovation and leadership strategist based in Silicon Valley. He is also a World Economic Forum faculty member. He advises C-level executives worldwide on breakthrough growth strategies. Navi is also writing a book on new models of leadership.

Jaideep Prabhu is the Jawaharlal Nehru Professor of Indian Business and Enterprise at Judge Business School, University of Cambridge. He has taught executives from ABN Amro, Bertelsmann, BP, BT, IBM, ING Bank, Nokia, Philips, Roche, Shell, Vodafone, and Xerox.

Simone Ahuja is the founder and principal of Blood Orange, a marketing and strategy consultancy with expertise in innovation and emerging markets. She regularly presents and consults to Fortune 500 companies across sectors, and contributes to a Harvard Business Review blog.

We got chatty with the trio and they had a lot to say to us on this topic which is widely growing and sweeping through companies. Here’s a look at what they had to say.

 

Today, global companies are talking about Jugaad as an effective approach to innovation. Meanwhile, jugaad is practiced in all Indian homes on a daily Basis, without giving it a second thought. What are some of the lessons that multinationals can learn from simple Indian households?

This is a great question.  It is exactly because jugaad and the jugaad mindset is so inherent in Indians that Indians are well poised to apply the principles of jugaad to business practices.  While jugaad can refer to quick fixes and low cost solutions, such as using a 2L Pepsi bottle to store pulses, use as a planter, a showerhead or even as chappals, it’s also a very important mindset.  The frugality and the flexible rather than linear approach to problem solving exhibited in many Indian households is a highly effective one that companies can and must learn to augment structured innovation processes and to grow, particularly in times of economic volatility.  Moreover, jugaad innovation is a great complement to more structured innovation processes, which leads to the creation of scale.

One of your favorite stories or ideas that you came across while writing this book?

There are so many outstanding and inspiring stories of jugaad innovation, particularly grassroots examples.  One of those SELCO, founded by Harish Hande, a company that destroyed the myth, that the poor cannot afford and maintain clean technology.  SELCO distributes solar energy to more than 200,000 rural households across India.  For us he epitomizes the frugal, flexible and inclusive mindset of a jugaad innovator.  First, he bootstrapped his venture with very limited resources and iterated on his model until he found one that works for him – ultimately, a highly innovative system of grassroots entrepreneurs who buy solar light and rent and distribute them on a daily basis.  He added tremendous value not only for the communities he served, but also for the micro-entrepreneurs with whom he partnered which in turn sustained his own business model.

Another important finding that emerged while researching for and writing this book is that jugaad is not unique to India.  In fact, similar approaches to innovation exist in many emerging markets including Brazil where it’s called jeitinho and China, where it’s called zizhu xuangxin – and even in the US, particularly among Generation Y and entrepreneurs, where there’s a growing DIY or do-it-yourself movement building that also calls for a frugal, flexbile and inclusive approach to problem solving.

Name 2 good companies practicing jugaad and how?

The Tata group is an example of an Indian company that practices jugaad. The Tata Nano is an outstanding example of the application of the principles of flexibility, frugality and inclusivity that are the hallmark of the jugaad mindset. So too with the Tata Swach. GE Healthcare is an example of a Western multinational that practices jugaad in India and elsewhere. The company used jugaad principles to develop a range of low cost ECG machines in India that it has also sold in other emerging markets as well as the West.

Before writing this book did you read any books on jugaad?

While we hadn’t read other books on jugaad, we conducted interviews with hundreds of grassroots entrepreneurs, corporate leaders and others in India to really understand the essence of jugaad.  Interestingly, we found it means different things to different people depending on geographic region and socio-economic status, etc.  We took all of these insights and distilled them into a definition of jugaad that underlines the best of it – a frugal, flexible and inclusive approach to problem solving and innovation.  In a sense, it is an amelioration like “hacking”, which at one time had a negative connotation and now has found its way into the business lexicon with many corporations conducting hackathons to find solutions to problems.  In this same way, we have extracted the best of jugaad since so many principles of jugaad innovation can benefit society at large.

Any tips on how can a startup company initiate and practice jugaad right from day one?

Startup companies (and the entrepreneurs that lead them) are the very epitome of jugaad. Our book and its principles are inspired by such companies and individuals. So for us to be telling startups how to apply jugaad would be a bit like us teaching fish how to swim! That said: two main principles of jugaad that are useful to startups are: 1) always look to get more with less (i.e., be frugal) and 2) always look to challenge conventional wisdom and look for non-linear solutions to problems (i.e., be flexible).

What made the 3 of you collaborate on such a project?

All three of us have unique perspectives that complemented our background and academic research for this book.  It began with ethnographic research for a film series that Simone’s company, Blood Orange, was creating for a corporate client who wanted to better understand innovation in emerging markets and how it may be relevant in the West.  For the series, Simone brought in Navi, then an analyst at Forrester whose focus was innovation and emerging markets, as an innovation consultant for the series.  Ultimately, Navi left Forrester to work with Jaideep, a marketing professor at the University of Cambridge’s Judge Business School, who was heading the Centre for India & Global Business there.  Navi later brought Simone in as a consultant for the Centre.  Much of our respective work was done separately, but with common themes particularly around innovation and emerging markets so it made sense for us to bring our interests and information together in a book like Jugaad Innovation.

 Would the 3 of you be collaborating in the future also?

Absolutely. The three of us continue to write articles on the subject of jugaad innovation and frugal innovation for the Harvard Business Review blog and publications like Fast Company, BusinessWeek as well as many newspapers in India and the US.  We also pursue individual study of jugaad based on our professional backgrounds, and share these learnings with each other.  We won’t say yet whether a Jugaad Innovation sequel is in the works, but there certainly is a lot more ground to cover around this subject!

Publisher: Random House India

Price: Rs 499

 

Signing Off For Now..

 

Until Next Time Geeks..

 

Happy Reading!

 

Crossword Bookstores

‘Ravana’ The Unsung Hero


Hello & Welcome Back Geeks to your dose of Bookipedia.  

We know all the story of The Great Rama and his epic victory on Lanka. The Tale of how the Prince of Ayodhya conquered the greatest evil Ravana is a legendary one. Ramayana has been narrated to us throughout ages and Rama the avatar of Vishnu is worshipped by all Indians.

But there’s a twist in the Tale…..

What if Ravana was not the Villian?

What if Ravana turned against the gods to save a dying race?

What if Ravana was just a hero as Rama for Ayodha for the people of Asura?

Well these questions will certainly make you curious..

There is a new Book Our Bestseller Charts Titled Asura: Tale of The Vanquished. It is the story of Ravana and his people which has never been told by anyone.

We got candid with the author Anand Neelakantan who hails from a small village near Cochin and spends his free times cartooning and on oil paintings. He has grown on these stories and since the last 6 years had nightmares of Ravana pleading to tell his side of the story to the world.

He says very modestly that he works at an MNC just to put food on his dining table but he definitely  enjoys writing to the fullest.

Here are the excerpts of his Interview.

1.       Do you feel after your story of Ravan can he be looked in a different light by the people who have always out casted him as a villain in the Ramayana?

Though Ravana was considered as evil incarnate, there always was some admiration lurching behind the hatred. Ravana was never an ordinary Villain. Accomplished Scholar, great musician, pious Bhaktha of Shiva- India has celebrated this most infamous villain in various ways over the last three thousand years or more. The heroism of the hero is proportional to the greatness of the villain. Ramayana works in the classic formula of an ordinary man challenging the might of a great emperor and winning against all odds. The God and Devil angle might have developed later.

What I have attempted is to reverse the gaze. Here an ordinary person is fighting his war against all odds, against the god incarnate and his mighty army. More than this war with others, he has to fight a war within himself, with his conscience, with his values and with his dreams.  I have also tried to view Ramayana, through the eyes of an ordinary and poor Asura- Bhadra, who adds another perspective to the story. Usually, epics are the stories of great men and their deeds. In the cacophony of heroism, divinity, demons, right, wrong, white, dark etc, the voice of the common man remains silent in any epic. But if we listen carefully, a faint voice can be heard. My Bhadra is the magnification of that feeble voice of such insignificant men.

I have tried to give more importance to humanity than divinity. My attempt is to view the events in this great epic rationally. Putting simply, Asura is the child of the thought-‘Why it could not have happened like this?’. A mark of a great literature is its power to change perceptions and thinking. Every author thinks that his piece of literature is a good one. I am no exception to it. However, it is in the hands of time to prove me right or wrong.

2.       How important was for you to tell this story?      

It was that important for making me toil six long years in writing it. It was that important for me to challenge every belief I have grown up with. It was that important for me to spend sleepless nights thinking like the Asura emperor or the poor Bhadra. Asura, I believe is as ancient as humanity and at the same time, it is as modern as possible. Writing is a painful process. But it is a pain that I enjoy. I write only when my thoughts become so painful that, unless I put it into words I will get choked.

3.       What are some of the unique characteristics of Ravana Outlined by you in the book?

Ravana is neither the demon as portrayed in the traditional Ramayanas nor is he the great hero who could do no wrong, as some Dravidian movements had tried to portray him a few decades back. In Asura, Ravana is man who lifts himself from abject poverty to become spectacularly successful through his determination, hard work and his strong sense of destiny. He starts of an idealistic youth, but gets lost in the labyrinth of power, and desperately tries to reclaim his ideals when it is too late. He is shown as an ordinary man who succeeds extraordinarily, but who gets corrupted by power. Despite this he manages to retain some shred of humanity till the last. On his positive sites, he is determined, intelligent, learned, brave, idealistic and passionate about life. On his negative side, he is a megalomaniac, arrogant, proud, and sometimes very naïve. History abounds with such characters like Napoleon, Alexander,  Raja Chola etc.

4.  What are some of the interesting comments you have got from your readers?

As it can be seen in various websites and reviews, mostly the comments have been positive. People have commented that the story has the power to change perception. I was also delighted to hear a few of the critical comments that said that though I have forgotten what Ramayana actually means and the story is based on my wrong understanding of the great epic, my narration skills are excellent and the book is a great read. One reader had written to me saying though he does not agree with even a single sentence in the book, he wanted to congratulate me for the good narrative and the logical arguments challenging the traditional Ramayana.

I was apprehensive that a bulky book of 500 pages, that deals with Ramayana, a story that has been told innumerable times will not find much favour with the young crowd who enjoy the light reads that gets mass produced these days. However, the response have been so overwhelming that the book is in third reprint now with more than 15000 copies sold so far in seven weeks.

5.      A para or a verse that you would like to quote from your book?

It is not the Gods or God men that my country lacks. It only lacks real men.

6.       Your views on your book being on Our Crossword Bestseller charts?

It is a special feeling which is difficult to express in words. I will try to tell you why this is so special.  Crossword has always been in the front of encouraging good writing in India. The Crossword award is proof enough for that. The customers, who frequent crossword and I am one among them, are very discerning and choosy. Mostly the purchase decisions from the bookshops are made after lot of thoughts. It is rarely an impulse purchase over the click of a mouse. You have to really love books to drive in the pounding monsoon, visit the shop, and stand in the queue and crowd. You have to be passionate about the smell of the books. If someone who spends time in sampling the blurb and a few pages of the book, and then again spend more time to compare them with other books in the shelf and then finally decide to purchase it, she should have liked what she could sample. So every purchase from crossword is special, in a way that could never be said about other modes of purchase.

It is such discerning customers of crossword have made my book Asura a best seller. I feel it is as special as any literary award and a great encouragement for debut writer like me. I would not mind spending many more sleepless nights for such success.

7.       Do you plan on sticking to the Mythological genre?

My publisher, Leadstart publishing Ltd is publishing my second book by this time, next year. It is on the next great epic and needless to say, I will be trying to view it from the other side. I do not have any plans to stick on to one particular genre, though I am passionate about mythology. I would love to write a satirical version on Indian Politics after my second book and another one spanning five generation, a semi-autobiographical one, that will portray my city of Cochin. Cochin is a city having a colourful history of many centuries and it will be fun writing about it in a wide panoramic background of my main story. Finally, when I am confident enough, I will pen down a children’s book. I believe, writing a quality children’s novel is the most difficult of all writings. Whenever I tend to forget this theory, my daughter and son are there to remind me this quite forcefully. Most nights, when I sit down to tell stories to them, I find them to be more difficult to please than my strict editor or even the most critical reader-s.

Publisher :Leadstart publishing

Price: Rs 250

 

Signing off for Now..

 

Until Next Time

 

Happy Reading!

 

Crossword Bookstores