India’s Dan Brown!!


Hello & Welcome Back Book lovers.

 

We bring to you the latest happening in the world of books.

 

Mysteries..Secrets..Lies…Revelations..Twisted Plots..Unexpected Relations…Decoding..Uncoding The Past, Present & Future..  

 

If this intrigues you ‘Ashwin Sanghi’ is definitely the author to watch out for.

 

A established and successful businessman by day and thrilling author by Night..Mr Sanghi is an all rounder. His books are a complete page tuner and keep you glued till the very end.

 

He has penned 2 thriller novels which won wide acclaims and awards. ‘The Rozabal Line’ was his first novel followed by ‘Chanakya Chant’ which won the Crossword Book Award Popular 2010. Ashwin  is one of the Bestselling Indian Authors of Today and he writes primarily on theological & historical thrillers. Currently he is pursuing a PHD in Creative Writing.

 

His New Book ‘The Krishna Key’ releases Today at a Crossword Bookstore near you.

 

Here is an extract from his interview..

 

1. You are called the Dan Brown of India… your sentiments on this tag. Have you also read his books?

 

I am rather flattered by the Dan Brown comparison… at last count he had sold over eighty million books! And yes, I have read all of Dan Brown’s books. However, I believe that the comparison is misplaced. While it is true that my novels are what could be called ‘historical conspiracies’, there are many authors who write in that genre besides Dan Brown… Steve Berry, Raymond Khoury and Alex Rutherford, to name just a few.

 

2. You’re the recipient of the Crossword Book Award-Popular 2010 and Chanakya’s Chant still continues to dominate the bestseller charts. Did you expect this reward and recognition?

 

I secretly wished that it would be a grand success but did not realistically expect it to happen. In a country where most youngsters prefer reading about campus romance, I did not believe that historical fiction with a contemporary political twist would be appreciated. Subsequent sales volumes proved me wrong though. The Crossword Popular Choice Award 2010 and UTV’s decision to make a movie on the book were the proverbial icing on the cake.

 

3. Your new book ‘The Krishna Key’ is soon going to be in all bookstores. Your readers’ expectations are definitely going to be high from this book. Are you nervous and excited about the same?

 

I am both nervous and excited. Nervous—because I do not want to disappoint my readers. Excited—because I love the plot of ‘The Krishna Key’. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that my readers will love it too!

 

4. Could tell us an interesting character or paragraph from your new book?

 

Here’s a paragraph that should give you a taste of what lies within:

Resigned to an only partial victory and having surveyed his handiwork, he took out a Swann-Morton scalpel that had been custom-engraved with the initials ‘R.M.’ from his belt bag, bent down over Varshney’s comatose body and with surgical precision thrust the scalpel into the sole of Varshney’s left foot, leaving it embedded in the flesh. It gashed through an artery. Blood spurted out while Varshney—still unconscious—began his long and agonising march towards death. The killer next took out an paintbrush from his belt pack. He gently dipped it into the puddle of blood that had formed around Varshney’s left foot and began to write, with the air of a calligrapher, on the wall above Varshney’s head: Mleccha-nivaha-nidhane kalayasi karavalam, dhumaketum iva kim api karalam,

kesava dhrita-kalki-sarira jaya jagadisa hare.

 

5. Do you plan on sticking to the historical thriller genre?

 

No. I simply want to spin yet another good old-fashioned yarn. I want to narrate stories in which the twists and turns keep you glued to the novel till three in the morning. The premise of the story should be delicious—bordering on outrageous perhaps—but history, theology or mythology is not a prerequisite. My next novel will have a touch of history because the story is built around an event that happened soon after Indian independence but it will be minimal.

 

6. According to you who are your contemporaries in Indian literature today?

 

Amish Tripathi, Mukul Deva, Vikram Chandra, Amitav Ghosh, Devdutt Pattanaik are among my favourites because they either write in the realm of history-mythology or write stories in the thriller genre. The list is growing rapidly though. Recent books by Manreet Sodhi Someshwar and Krishna Udayasankar seem to indicate that the interest in history and mythology is gaining momentum as we speak.

 

 

7. Working on a full time job and writing how do you manage both?

 

I write early mornings on weekdays and then put in a regular eight-hour day at the office. I use my Saturdays to gain writing momentum and leave Sundays entirely for family time. During the year I take four weeks off to write so that I may complete whatever happens to be my current project. Strong coffee in the morning and a peg of whiskey in the evening keep me going. Work keeps Lakshmi smiling and my writing keeps Saraswati in good humour… what more could I possibly ask for?

 

The Krishna Key

 

Publisher: Westland

 

Price:250

 

 

Signing off for Now..

 

Until Next Time Geeks

 

 

Happy Reading!

 

Crossword Bookstores

 

The New ‘It Bouy’ of Publishing


Hello & Welcome back Book Lovers to you daily dose of Bookipedia.

All you girls who just go gaga over SRK’s cute dimples its time you meet the new chocolate boy in town.

Known for his cute dimples and his quirky and heart wrenching love stories that have touched over millions of girls all over the country..Durjoy Datta is the shy author(boy) next door.

An engineer and MBA by profession he has already written 6 run away bestsellers in a span of 4 years. As a successful author he continued his journey by venturing into his own Publishing Company titled Grapevine India Publishers  which has published over 20 books till date. Durjoy is also the recipient of Teachers Achievement Award 2012.

 Charming..Witty..Versatile..Modest that’s how we describe Durjoy Datta..

 

Read more from his interview..

 

1.       You have so many female fan who worship and adore you and go crazy with your writing..How do you handle all the fame & attention?

It’s very flattering and it’s really not that hard to handle. Obviously, I feel great about it and wish it would go on! But I make sure I don’t get too stuck with it and concentrate on the work in hand.

 2.  Do you think you are a better writer when you work in collaboration with another author..As most of your books have been  co-authored by others.

I think it brings in a different perspective to the story. I might write something that doesn’t make sense, but since I write it, I win my arguments against common sense. When you have another author working in tandem, it’s becomes very hard to ignore details that might be important to the story. A co-author is a constant source of criticism and keeps me from running haywire.

    3.        Your New book ‘Someone Like you’ Comes out by the end of this year under  Penguin Books India..Why the shift in publishing your book?

Grapevine India was set up after I had already signed up with Penguin for this book. So that’s the reason. But I may choose to associate myself with other publishing houses too. To broaden my experience as an author, to work with different organizations and other editors and to learn from them. It’s a decision I have to take as an author and not as a founder of a publishing house.

4.       At 25 you have already written 6 books and have started your own publishing company. People at your age are still trying to figure out life and where they want to be..Your message to these budding young guns.

I never really had a timeline or an action plan to go by. I didn’t really decide that I have to have these many books published or start a publishing house. I just did what appealed to me the most and I am happy where it has taken me. My only message to others like me is to do what you most love. And if you do it well enough, other things will fall in place.

 

Now some Fun questions..

 

Your favorite Adventure holiday spot..

I think I enjoyed my stay in Budapest a lot. And I am an at-least-once-a-year-Goa person.

 

Your favorite romantic read.

 It keeps on changing. The last romance novel that I read was “The Last Song” and I quite liked it. Even “One Summer” by David Baldacci is a good read.

 

 Your current read..

I’m Not A Serial Killer by Dan Wells.

 

When you’re not working your..

 I am either out with friends, or well, reading a book!

 

Are you a typical Delhi boy..

       Oh yes, most certainly. I love my parties, I love my food, I love working out, I love honking in traffic jams and involve myself in road rage incidents. All the good parts, as well as the bad ones.

 

 Your fetish..

Is to be surrounded with books, women, great food and sports!

 

A memorable feedback from your fans..

A few days back, a girl tattooed the name of a protagonist from my book on her back. So that’s was pretty flattering and overwhelming!

 

Things who look for in an ideal partner..

Should be smart, funny, and non-clingy! Shouldn’t care too much about what she’s wearing and where she is going.  And good looks never hurt anybody.

 

Books By Durjoy  (@ Rs 100)

Of Course I Love You! …Till I Find Someone Better!

Now That You’re Rich! …Lets Fall In Love!

She Broke Up, I Didn’t! …I Just Kissed Someone Else!

Ohh Yes, I Am Single! …And So Is My Girlfriend!

You Were My Crush! …Till You Said You Love Me!

If It’s Not Forever… It’s Not Love!

 

Upcoming Books:

Till The Last Breath (Grapevine Publishers): September 2012

Someone Like You (Penguin India): December 2012

 

Signing off for now..

 

Do drop in your comments.

 

Until Next Time Geeks

 

Happy Reading!

 

Crossword Bookstores

‘Jugaad’ The Indian Way of Life


Jugaad is a word most commonly heard in India. It implies quick fix solution to any problem. It is a common phenomenon observe on the streets of India in small ways like fixing things with safety pins, turning cycles into a mobile shop of necessities, selling clothes by displaying it on the trees and many more..

A new book on the block ‘ Jugaad Innovation’ talks about how jugaad can help you find great solution to problems and can turn any adversity into an opportunity.

The 3 authors, Navi Radjou, Jaideep Prabhu, Simone Ahuja, talk about this phenomena that is helping MNC’s to develop breakthrough paths to grow in this competitive market.

A little more on about this dynamic trio:

Navi Radjou is an innovation and leadership strategist based in Silicon Valley. He is also a World Economic Forum faculty member. He advises C-level executives worldwide on breakthrough growth strategies. Navi is also writing a book on new models of leadership.

Jaideep Prabhu is the Jawaharlal Nehru Professor of Indian Business and Enterprise at Judge Business School, University of Cambridge. He has taught executives from ABN Amro, Bertelsmann, BP, BT, IBM, ING Bank, Nokia, Philips, Roche, Shell, Vodafone, and Xerox.

Simone Ahuja is the founder and principal of Blood Orange, a marketing and strategy consultancy with expertise in innovation and emerging markets. She regularly presents and consults to Fortune 500 companies across sectors, and contributes to a Harvard Business Review blog.

We got chatty with the trio and they had a lot to say to us on this topic which is widely growing and sweeping through companies. Here’s a look at what they had to say.

 

Today, global companies are talking about Jugaad as an effective approach to innovation. Meanwhile, jugaad is practiced in all Indian homes on a daily Basis, without giving it a second thought. What are some of the lessons that multinationals can learn from simple Indian households?

This is a great question.  It is exactly because jugaad and the jugaad mindset is so inherent in Indians that Indians are well poised to apply the principles of jugaad to business practices.  While jugaad can refer to quick fixes and low cost solutions, such as using a 2L Pepsi bottle to store pulses, use as a planter, a showerhead or even as chappals, it’s also a very important mindset.  The frugality and the flexible rather than linear approach to problem solving exhibited in many Indian households is a highly effective one that companies can and must learn to augment structured innovation processes and to grow, particularly in times of economic volatility.  Moreover, jugaad innovation is a great complement to more structured innovation processes, which leads to the creation of scale.

One of your favorite stories or ideas that you came across while writing this book?

There are so many outstanding and inspiring stories of jugaad innovation, particularly grassroots examples.  One of those SELCO, founded by Harish Hande, a company that destroyed the myth, that the poor cannot afford and maintain clean technology.  SELCO distributes solar energy to more than 200,000 rural households across India.  For us he epitomizes the frugal, flexible and inclusive mindset of a jugaad innovator.  First, he bootstrapped his venture with very limited resources and iterated on his model until he found one that works for him – ultimately, a highly innovative system of grassroots entrepreneurs who buy solar light and rent and distribute them on a daily basis.  He added tremendous value not only for the communities he served, but also for the micro-entrepreneurs with whom he partnered which in turn sustained his own business model.

Another important finding that emerged while researching for and writing this book is that jugaad is not unique to India.  In fact, similar approaches to innovation exist in many emerging markets including Brazil where it’s called jeitinho and China, where it’s called zizhu xuangxin – and even in the US, particularly among Generation Y and entrepreneurs, where there’s a growing DIY or do-it-yourself movement building that also calls for a frugal, flexbile and inclusive approach to problem solving.

Name 2 good companies practicing jugaad and how?

The Tata group is an example of an Indian company that practices jugaad. The Tata Nano is an outstanding example of the application of the principles of flexibility, frugality and inclusivity that are the hallmark of the jugaad mindset. So too with the Tata Swach. GE Healthcare is an example of a Western multinational that practices jugaad in India and elsewhere. The company used jugaad principles to develop a range of low cost ECG machines in India that it has also sold in other emerging markets as well as the West.

Before writing this book did you read any books on jugaad?

While we hadn’t read other books on jugaad, we conducted interviews with hundreds of grassroots entrepreneurs, corporate leaders and others in India to really understand the essence of jugaad.  Interestingly, we found it means different things to different people depending on geographic region and socio-economic status, etc.  We took all of these insights and distilled them into a definition of jugaad that underlines the best of it – a frugal, flexible and inclusive approach to problem solving and innovation.  In a sense, it is an amelioration like “hacking”, which at one time had a negative connotation and now has found its way into the business lexicon with many corporations conducting hackathons to find solutions to problems.  In this same way, we have extracted the best of jugaad since so many principles of jugaad innovation can benefit society at large.

Any tips on how can a startup company initiate and practice jugaad right from day one?

Startup companies (and the entrepreneurs that lead them) are the very epitome of jugaad. Our book and its principles are inspired by such companies and individuals. So for us to be telling startups how to apply jugaad would be a bit like us teaching fish how to swim! That said: two main principles of jugaad that are useful to startups are: 1) always look to get more with less (i.e., be frugal) and 2) always look to challenge conventional wisdom and look for non-linear solutions to problems (i.e., be flexible).

What made the 3 of you collaborate on such a project?

All three of us have unique perspectives that complemented our background and academic research for this book.  It began with ethnographic research for a film series that Simone’s company, Blood Orange, was creating for a corporate client who wanted to better understand innovation in emerging markets and how it may be relevant in the West.  For the series, Simone brought in Navi, then an analyst at Forrester whose focus was innovation and emerging markets, as an innovation consultant for the series.  Ultimately, Navi left Forrester to work with Jaideep, a marketing professor at the University of Cambridge’s Judge Business School, who was heading the Centre for India & Global Business there.  Navi later brought Simone in as a consultant for the Centre.  Much of our respective work was done separately, but with common themes particularly around innovation and emerging markets so it made sense for us to bring our interests and information together in a book like Jugaad Innovation.

 Would the 3 of you be collaborating in the future also?

Absolutely. The three of us continue to write articles on the subject of jugaad innovation and frugal innovation for the Harvard Business Review blog and publications like Fast Company, BusinessWeek as well as many newspapers in India and the US.  We also pursue individual study of jugaad based on our professional backgrounds, and share these learnings with each other.  We won’t say yet whether a Jugaad Innovation sequel is in the works, but there certainly is a lot more ground to cover around this subject!

Publisher: Random House India

Price: Rs 499

 

Signing Off For Now..

 

Until Next Time Geeks..

 

Happy Reading!

 

Crossword Bookstores

Never Judge A Book By Its Cover


The Cover of J.K Rowling’s much awaited Adult book ‘The Casual vacancy is out.

 

48 hrs already into its launch The Cover of the book is much under scrutiny for its look and appeal.

 

Critics have pointed out that compared to the Covers of The Harry Potter series , the cover of her book lacks depth and doesn’t strike out differently.

Well we wouldn’t want to compare the Harry Potter series with her upcoming book as they are completely different genres .

 

But the real question is.. Is the Cover more important than the story itself??

 

Do books get sold only on the basis of How attractive is the book Cover?

Image

Or Would you buy a book for the author and their story .

 

Would love to hear from you (Our Dear Critiques & geeks)

 

Signing off..

 

Crossword Bookstores