India’s Dan Brown!!


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We bring to you the latest happening in the world of books.

 

Mysteries..Secrets..Lies…Revelations..Twisted Plots..Unexpected Relations…Decoding..Uncoding The Past, Present & Future..  

 

If this intrigues you ‘Ashwin Sanghi’ is definitely the author to watch out for.

 

A established and successful businessman by day and thrilling author by Night..Mr Sanghi is an all rounder. His books are a complete page tuner and keep you glued till the very end.

 

He has penned 2 thriller novels which won wide acclaims and awards. ‘The Rozabal Line’ was his first novel followed by ‘Chanakya Chant’ which won the Crossword Book Award Popular 2010. Ashwin  is one of the Bestselling Indian Authors of Today and he writes primarily on theological & historical thrillers. Currently he is pursuing a PHD in Creative Writing.

 

His New Book ‘The Krishna Key’ releases Today at a Crossword Bookstore near you.

 

Here is an extract from his interview..

 

1. You are called the Dan Brown of India… your sentiments on this tag. Have you also read his books?

 

I am rather flattered by the Dan Brown comparison… at last count he had sold over eighty million books! And yes, I have read all of Dan Brown’s books. However, I believe that the comparison is misplaced. While it is true that my novels are what could be called ‘historical conspiracies’, there are many authors who write in that genre besides Dan Brown… Steve Berry, Raymond Khoury and Alex Rutherford, to name just a few.

 

2. You’re the recipient of the Crossword Book Award-Popular 2010 and Chanakya’s Chant still continues to dominate the bestseller charts. Did you expect this reward and recognition?

 

I secretly wished that it would be a grand success but did not realistically expect it to happen. In a country where most youngsters prefer reading about campus romance, I did not believe that historical fiction with a contemporary political twist would be appreciated. Subsequent sales volumes proved me wrong though. The Crossword Popular Choice Award 2010 and UTV’s decision to make a movie on the book were the proverbial icing on the cake.

 

3. Your new book ‘The Krishna Key’ is soon going to be in all bookstores. Your readers’ expectations are definitely going to be high from this book. Are you nervous and excited about the same?

 

I am both nervous and excited. Nervous—because I do not want to disappoint my readers. Excited—because I love the plot of ‘The Krishna Key’. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that my readers will love it too!

 

4. Could tell us an interesting character or paragraph from your new book?

 

Here’s a paragraph that should give you a taste of what lies within:

Resigned to an only partial victory and having surveyed his handiwork, he took out a Swann-Morton scalpel that had been custom-engraved with the initials ‘R.M.’ from his belt bag, bent down over Varshney’s comatose body and with surgical precision thrust the scalpel into the sole of Varshney’s left foot, leaving it embedded in the flesh. It gashed through an artery. Blood spurted out while Varshney—still unconscious—began his long and agonising march towards death. The killer next took out an paintbrush from his belt pack. He gently dipped it into the puddle of blood that had formed around Varshney’s left foot and began to write, with the air of a calligrapher, on the wall above Varshney’s head: Mleccha-nivaha-nidhane kalayasi karavalam, dhumaketum iva kim api karalam,

kesava dhrita-kalki-sarira jaya jagadisa hare.

 

5. Do you plan on sticking to the historical thriller genre?

 

No. I simply want to spin yet another good old-fashioned yarn. I want to narrate stories in which the twists and turns keep you glued to the novel till three in the morning. The premise of the story should be delicious—bordering on outrageous perhaps—but history, theology or mythology is not a prerequisite. My next novel will have a touch of history because the story is built around an event that happened soon after Indian independence but it will be minimal.

 

6. According to you who are your contemporaries in Indian literature today?

 

Amish Tripathi, Mukul Deva, Vikram Chandra, Amitav Ghosh, Devdutt Pattanaik are among my favourites because they either write in the realm of history-mythology or write stories in the thriller genre. The list is growing rapidly though. Recent books by Manreet Sodhi Someshwar and Krishna Udayasankar seem to indicate that the interest in history and mythology is gaining momentum as we speak.

 

 

7. Working on a full time job and writing how do you manage both?

 

I write early mornings on weekdays and then put in a regular eight-hour day at the office. I use my Saturdays to gain writing momentum and leave Sundays entirely for family time. During the year I take four weeks off to write so that I may complete whatever happens to be my current project. Strong coffee in the morning and a peg of whiskey in the evening keep me going. Work keeps Lakshmi smiling and my writing keeps Saraswati in good humour… what more could I possibly ask for?

 

The Krishna Key

 

Publisher: Westland

 

Price:250

 

 

Signing off for Now..

 

Until Next Time Geeks

 

 

Happy Reading!

 

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